Last year I finally got a chance to visit and shoot a unique place called Cline’s Country Antiques in Mt Pleasant, North Carolina.  My photo buddy in the Carolinas is Edgar Payne and he met up with me there to show me around.  Here is a little history on Clines.
 Donald Cline has always had a love for old things. Living on land that has been in his family for 200 years has nurtured his love and respect for the past.  With diverse degrees from poultry science to economics, and even a time in the Navy Reserves, he wasn’t quite sure what he wanted to do with his life. He enjoyed attending the many rural auctions in the area and started collecting by the truck load. It quickly outgrew his home and barn. In 1975, the family decided to quit farming. With numerous barns now empty, Don collected even more. In 1977 he opened Clines Country Antiques on the old home place in Mt. Pleasant, North Carolina. In 1980 he left his teaching career to devote all his time “junk”.
    In the 30 years that he has operated, he has been involved supplying decor and signage to many restaurants. Cline’s Antiques has provided set decor and props for many major movies such as “The Color Purple.”
In 1986, he co-authored “Buying and Selling Antiques: A Dealers Inside View.”  He has been featured in numerous newspaper articles, magazines such as “Our State,” and on Home and Garden TV.
    Cline hates to throw anything away.  He knows that somewhere, someone may need or want that very thing. This is not a “prissy” place. Come dressed prepared to rummage and wander over acres of things.
Cline’s Antiques is open Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 8 a.m. till 6 p.m.
If you ever get a chance to visit this fun place do it, you will be amazed.  Acres of land and buildings full of antiques and oddball stuff.   Here are some of the images I shot just in a few hours.  It’s place that would take many days to really explore and shoot.

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Edgar on the left, me on the right, and some of our friends behind us.

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Bring on the Frost

Posted: December 4, 2016 in Uncategorized
The full force of winter as far as cold is not yet here in southeast Michigan, but it won’t be long now.  We are getting the nice frosty mornings which does provide good subjects to shoot.  I haven’t been able to get out lately for some new frosty shots but here are a couple from the past.

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Podcasts for the Road

Posted: December 2, 2016 in Uncategorized
Many of you know I drive to all my Macro Boot Camps and photo conferences all across the county. In order to keep myself sane through all the miles, I listen to music on my Ipod.
As much as I like the hundreds of songs I listen to, I start to get tired of it after about 8 hours on the road, so I will then turn on the radio and search for a local talk show in the area I’m passing through.
Although I know of all the free photography podcasts (many that I have been interviewed on) that are available for free through Itunes, I never thought to down load some and listen to them while I drive.
One of the best in photo podcasts is called “The Candid Frame”. I was honored to be one of their guest in podcast #149. The reason I was honor was that they have interview all the biggest names in pro photography.
So I down loaded a bunch of the pros that I was interested in listening to for my long drives.
I have never listened to any of theses podcasts, and even when I have been speaking at photo conferences, I generally never go to any of the other photographer’s presentation.
Just as I want my images to stand out from all other photographers, I’ve always wanted my workshops and presentation to be of my own style and way of doing things, and never wanted any outside influences from other pro photographers, so I avoided hearing other pros speak.
I finally decided to listen to some of these podcasts to learn more about some of the other pros and see what they had to say.
Much to my surprise, what I heard from every pro was right in line with what I was teaching and the philosophy I have with photography. Concentrate on learning about subject matter, compositions, and less worry about the equipment.
When all were asked what photographer they would recommend that listeners should check out, many refereed to photographers that had books geared to composition, and less on the technical side.
I liked what I heard because it reinforced what I believe and teach in my programs. So looking forward to hearing more podcasts, and it sure breaks up the long miles on the road.
Website click here
Macro Workshops click here
”Macro Online Course click here
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Has Someone Stole Your Image

Posted: December 1, 2016 in Uncategorized

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http://picturedefense.com is a place where you can go now for help in dealing with someone who has stolen one of your photos on the web. They walk you through the steps to correct the problem. check them out.

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Website click here
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Two days ago my post on making money selling your photos drew an amazing amount of interest.  On most  blog post I would get three to four  hundred views, but on the making money post, it had over two thousand views.  It shows just how many photographers are looking to make money with their photos.  I get that, because I am one of those people making money with my photography. I found a quote on the state of the nature photography business by a very famous established wildlife photographer named Jim Brandenburg.  Here is Jim’s bio and following that will be his quote.

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Minnesota native Jim Brandenburg traveled the globe as a photographer with National Geographic magazine for over three decades. He has done assignment work and has been published in numerous national and international publications including the New York Times, Life, Time, Audubon, Smithsonian, Natural History, GEO, Modern Maturity, BBC Wildlife, Outdoor Photographer, National Wildlife, and Outside.
His career with the National Geographic Society resulted in 23 magazine stories, several television features and many National Geographic books. His November 1997 National Geographic magazine feature, “North Woods Journal,” was—according to editor William Allen—“the most photographs the magazine has ever published in one feature in its entire history … and by the way, using the least amount of film.” The bestseller Chased by the Light elaborates on Brandenburg’s experiences during the 90 days. Brandenburg produced a sequel, titled Looking for the Summer. A sample of that project was featured in the June 2003 issue of National Geographic magazine and the November 2003 issue of Outdoor Photographer and was the first completely digital story featured in both magazines’ histories.
Brandenburg’s work has been featured on all major television and radio networks including Sunday Morning with Charles Kuralt, Dateline NBC, Animal Planet, and the National Geographic Channel, as well as National Public Radio’s All Things Considered.

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Last year I was doing some exploring on the internet of different photographers and I found this quote by Brandonburg on his blog.  It showed his frustration on the business of being a nature photographer.  As big as he is as a nature photographer, I take it he is also feeling the pressure of all the incoming photographers looking to make money as  nature photographers. Here is his quote.
“Business like Nature Photography has changed. It has become a bit bizarre. In the old days, when we were still using Kodachrome cameras, you really had to understand photography and be really good at it to survive. Nowadays, take someone with a moderate amount of talent but who has never made a picture in their lives before. They go to the camera store and buy even a cheap camera. In the same day that someone can make a magazine-worthy picture, if they have some sense of composition.
There are ten – even hundred – thousand photographers out there doing this and they have destroyed the Nature Photography business in terms of income. In terms of magazine photography, books and photo publishing, there are so many photographers that are willing to give their images away just to be published, just for the fun of it”.
I am like all of those photographers that came along in the digital age and started producing good quality images with the help of a digital camera and all the great software to correct mistakes, and improve images.  In the days of film, as Brandenburg states, you had to really be a good photographer with the understanding on how to work the camera and getting it done right without any post processing help.  So because photography has gotten so much easier to make great images, it has also lost the mystic of someone who made a great image in the film days.  I see so many amateur photographers that produce images that are every bit as good as the best pro photographers.  So of course they want to make some money as well.
The problem is as we have more photographers coming into the business it will cut down on sales of prints, workshops, book sales for everyone, just as it did to the stock photography business.    I surely don’t have a right to complain about this because like all of you wanting to make some money, I did as well.  I just hope I can keep making a living with my business for a few more years until I decide to retire.

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Website click here
Macro Workshops click here
”Macro Online Course click here
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You can buy my images from a select group at GreatBigCanvas.com
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Macro Boot Camp – Orlando,FL

Posted: November 29, 2016 in Uncategorized
WayneBennettPhotography Presents –Macro Boot Camp with Mike Moats
Saturday and Sunday, April 22 and 23, 2017
Courtyard by Marriott, Orlando, Florida
Limit 25, Cost $195
Bring your camera, macro lens or what ever you have, and tripod.
Click on the link below for more info and scroll to the bottom of the page to sign up.
http://waynebennettphotography.com/tours/mike-moats-macro-boot-camp/

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Website click here
Macro Workshops click here
”Macro Online Course click here
”Creating Art With Macro E-Book click here
Macro Photo Conference click here
You can buy my images from a select group at GreatBigCanvas.com
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The Benefits of Macro Photography

Posted: November 29, 2016 in Uncategorized
After a few years photography landscapes, I found my calling, passion, and career as a macro photographer. It wasn’t my intentions to shoot macro as my interest in my new hobby in the beginning was to be a landscape photographer. I had studied all the great landscape images that were printed on the pages of “Outdoor Photographer” and decided that was what I wanted to shoot. With my limited time and budget to travel to the national parks where the best landscapes were, and only two weeks a year of vacation, it didn’t satisfy my desire and left me with fifty weeks of mundane landscape opportunities in the northern suburbs of Detroit. I wanted to get outdoors and shoot something, so I decided to look into macro, which gave me more subject matter though out the year during the times I wasn’t able to travel. It didn’t take long before I realized how much fun macro was with all the great artwork that Mother Nature provided to photograph. I began to realize all of the benefits of being a macro photographer, and have since dedicated all of my time to macro, and no longer shoot landscapes.
You don’t have to travel far as macro subjects are everywhere. You can find it at the local parks, in your own yard, and even shoot inside your home. I have four great parks within twenty minutes of my home, and probably seventy percent of my best images are photographed in those parks. I also have a few of my best selling images that were shot in my backyard. Most people have flower gardens in their yard, so they can walk outside their home and shoot. This close convenience saves on the high cost of fuel and wear and tear on our vehicles, and saves on time as we can shoot when we just have an hour or two available. In the winter here in Michigan I do most of my shooting indoors, so I buy flower from the local florist, go online to websites that sell feathers, mounted butterflies, sea shells, slab agates, which all can be arranged into artistic compositions.
You can shoot with just one lens.  You don’t need a whole arsenal of lenses for macro photography, I got by with one lens for seven years before I added on to my stable of lenses. I shot for those first seven years using a macro lens in the 180mm range. If you are starting out as a macro photographer and limited on funds, a mid range focal length lens like the Tamron 90mm will work great for all purposes. If you plan to shoot live subjects such as butterflies, dragonflies, and other small critters that will flee as you approach to close, go with the longer focal length lens like Tamron’s 180mm. If you like to handhold your camera, try the light and fast shooting Tamron 60mm macro lens. For macro photography plan on shooting the majority of your shots with your camera mounted on a good study tripod and ballhead.
Subject matter changes every month. With the four seasons, we have an ever-changing environment month by month and sometimes day by day. I can revisit the same areas every couple weeks and find new subjects. It’s a constant cycle evolving from life to death. Depending on where you live, your seasons may vary and the environment may be totally different from the rest of the country. Learn about the subjects and life cycles of the plants and critters in your area, and make sure you are in the field when subjects come into season.
Shoot any time of day.  Landscape and wildlife photographers have limited control over lighting and tend to shoot early morning and late evening which offers the best light. Because of the small subjects macro photographers work with, we have the ability to control our light by using diffusers and reflectors, so we can shoot any time of the day. I carry a 12” diffuser which I use to control harsh overhead light or sunlight from hitting my subjects, and a 12” silver/gold reflector for bouncing light into shaded areas of a subject.
More Creativity.  One of the challenges as a macro photographer is working with depth of field. Because we are shooting very close to our subjects, the depth of field is very shallow causing lots of out of focus areas in our photos. The closer we get to the subject, the less that will be in focus. We can use this shallow depth of field to our advantage in creating artistic compositions. If you like soft focus dream like images, shoot in the lower f/stop range, and use this shallow depth of field to produce some beautiful artwork. If you have a subject that may have some interesting lines or textures that you may what to show off, you can set your f/stop in the highest numbers and bring everything into focus. So we have the ability to get everything in focus and also use the shallow depth of field to be more creative.
Your own personal art. Your own personal art is one of my favorite benefits. Every image that you view on my website is an original. They are subjects that were present for only a brief moment in time, until the environment erased them forever. None of the images that I have can be reproduced again because the subjects do not exists anymore. Mountains, rivers, lakes, are all there day after day and can be photographed over and over by many, many photographers, but my subjects have been eliminated by Mother Nature and are images that I can call my own originals.
Each year more and more nature photographers discover the benefits of macro.  Take some time and explore all the local parks and your own backyard and enjoy the fun of macro photography.

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Website click here
Macro Workshops click here
”Macro Online Course click here
”Creating Art With Macro E-Book click here
Macro Photo Conference click here
You can buy my images from a select group at GreatBigCanvas.com
To save 15% on Topaz products click here
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Share through social media, click links at bottom of this article.