Land of the Giants

Posted: February 8, 2015 in Uncategorized
Last year when I was in California teaching workshops I got a chance to visit the Sequoia National Park and was amazed at the size of these trees. They grow close to the top of a mountain which is a crazy twisting, turning, slow16 mile long road to get up to the top. If you get motion sickness take Dramamine before you drive up. I can’t even imagine who venture up to the top of this mountain and stumble across these giant, and then who even thought it would be possible to make a road up there. Must of took a long time to built it. I first hiked to see the largest of the Sequoia’s called General Sherman. Very impressive but I couldn’t get near it to take a picture of me standing next to it so you can see the enormous size, plus the sun was blasting on the trunk making it useless to shoot. I did find one large tree that was right next to the trail that I could pose by to give you some scale of these trees.

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Here is a shot of a hiker in red pants, black top on the right side of the tree, look how tiny he is.

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Not much in the way of macro here to shoot, as the understory is just dirt covered in needles, and leaves and very little plant life anywhere. I did take a few macro shots that I’ll post another day. Here are some images of the tree.

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Comments
  1. Jeff Morett says:

    My wife and I traveled out west in the ’70s and stopped at many of the parks. We also had the pleasure of visiting Sequoia Nat’l Park. I always felt like I was in a Lilliputian world or Land of the Giants, literally. The size and scale of the trees is enormous. If you love nature and you have an opportunity it’s a must see. I’m glad you made it up the ‘road’. In a word it’s wicked. Loved the photos Mike, It took me back to when I was there also, thanks.

    Take care, Jeff

  2. lighthouse75 says:

    These are amazing images, Mike! I’m glad you were able to include people in a couple of them to show the scale. Such venerable old trees — thank you for honoring them with your photography.

  3. summitjim says:

    When I lived in Visalia I used to go up there a lot. It was about a two hour drive, as I recall. A very impressive place to visit, and your photos bring back fond memories. It’s really difficult to show those trees in their enormity, they are so massive.

    My son was about 5 years old then, and we once ran into a bear cub. The poor Ranger had quite a job keeping the visitors away from the bear, and we never did see Mama bear who was probably close by.

    I look forward to seeing the macro shots you took.

  4. I lived in the Santa Cruz Mountains in California under the Redwoods for many years. The trees are so big you can’t really capture how big they really are. They remind me of my trip to Arches National Park in Utah. The formations are so big you can’t capture their true scale. Do you all remember the National Geographic issue about the big Redwood trees. Here is a composite of a 300 foot tree – http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/redwoods/gatefold-image

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